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KNOWLEDGE

OXFORD FABRIC

Knowledge Originally woven by Scottish cotton mills in the late 1800s, Oxford was one of four contemporary fabrics named after the world’s most prestigious universities.

Oxford cloth is made by interlacing pairs of fine warp yarns with a single slightly heavier weft, resulting in an unbalanced basket weave. The looser structure of the basket weave (compared to a traditional plain weave) makes Oxford less prone to wrinkling, and it is traditionally used in men’s casual shirting. Classic Oxford is often woven with dyed warp yarns and a white weft which further enhances the signature checkerboard pattern and creates a subtle two-colour effect with a faint lustre.

Originally woven by Scottish mills in the late 1800s, Oxford was one of four contemporary fabrics named after the world’s most prestigious universities, which also included Cambridge, Harvard, and Yale. Made with coarser cotton qualities, it was an inexpensive and airy material that later became popular for athletic wear, such as tennis and polo shirts.

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About ARKET

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People

ARKET and Apartamento Bookshop

For the launch of the ARKET and Apartamento Bookshop, a collaborative pop-up touring Berlin, Stockholm, Paris and Barcelona throughout 2024, the Apartamento editorial team invited photographer Iris Humm to capture some day-to-day scenes and moments at their head office.

 

 

RECIPE

BAKED SWEET POTATOES WITH APPLE SALSA

Introducing a new seasonal recipe from Martin Berg, our head chef at the ARKET Café. Baked sweet potatoes with fresh and herby apple salsa, a lighter vegan dish for weekday dinners or suitable as a side on the Sunday brunch table.

 

care

TAKE CARE OF YOUR PRODUCTS

Longevity is at the core of our brand. If our clothes are used beyond their first wearer, we have done something right. Designing for circularity starts at the drawing table – and extends to guiding customers on how to take care of our products.