Thank you for subscribing

You will receive an email with the discount code shortly.

i
Services
Information and Services
AboutCaféStoresBrandsRecipesCareCareersNewsletterCustomer service
Shipping To: null
Filters
Filters
Colour
  • Colour

My bag 

Your bag is empty

Added To Bag

Checkout
ITEM NOT ADDED

This product is sold only in limited numbers per customer. You cannot add more items to your shopping bag.

history Oxford shoes

Oxford shoes are characterised by their closed-lacing construction with a narrow V-shape under the laces. The Oxford is considered more formal than open-laced derby shoes and is traditionally clean-lined with five eyelets, a low heel and an exposed ankle; it is often un-ornamented but can also be decorated with brogue punching. The style emerged during the mid-19th century and was described as ‘low shoes’ to distinguish it from the more common heeled boot.

history Oxford shoes

oxford-shoes

Oxford shoes are characterised by their closed-lacing construction with a narrow V-shape under the laces. This is created by stitching the front half of the shoe, called the vamp, on top of the back half, the quarters, where the eyelet facings are placed. The V-shape on top of the tongue gradually disappears and the quarters touch each other after the shoes are worn in and the leather softens.

The Oxford is considered more formal than open-laced derby shoes and is traditionally clean-lined with five eyelets, a low heel and an exposed ankle; it is often un-ornamented but can also be decorated with brogue punching. The cap-toe is the most widespread variation of the standard Oxford construction, featuring an extra piece of leather across the toe box.

The Oxford style emerged during the mid-19th century and was described as ‘low shoes’ to distinguish it from the more common heeled boot.