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history Derby shoe

A derby shoe is created by stitching the two quarters, which are the back pieces of the shoe where the eyelets are placed, on top of the front half, called the vamp. The tongue is an extension of the vamp, rather than a separate piece. The derby is seen as less formal than the close-laced Oxford and is also known as a Blucher or Gibson.

 Trickers Woodstock Derby
 Trickers Keswick

history Derby shoes

derby-shoes

history Derby shoe

The term ‘derby’ refers to a general type of open-laced shoes, sewn from three pieces of leather. A derby shoe is created by stitching the two quarters, which are the back pieces of the shoe where the eyelets are placed, on top of the front half, called the vamp. The tongue is an extension of the vamp, rather than a separate piece. The derby is seen as less formal than the close-laced Oxford and is also known as a Blucher or Gibson.

The open-lace system makes it easier to adjust the width and fit of the shoe, and the style was originally developed for this particular reason in the late 19th century. In 1872, it was described in a British publication as a new and more comfortable alternative to the tight-fitting Oxford, especially for the summer months.