Thank you for subscribing

You will receive an email with the discount code shortly.

i
Services
Information and Services
My accountStores & cafésCustomer serviceCareersProduct careNewsletter
Shipping To: null
Filters
Filters
Colour
  • Colour

My bag 

Your bag is empty

Added To Bag

Checkout
ITEM NOT ADDED

This product is sold only in limited numbers per customer. You cannot add more items to your shopping bag.

History Terracotta

From the Latin words 'terra cocta', meaning baked earth, terracotta is a mix of clay and water hardened by fire at low heat, resulting in a brittle and porous product. The typical red to ochre colour is produced when the iron in the clay reacts to oxygen during firing. Often left untinted and in its raw porous texture, terracotta can also be stained or glazed to give it a shiny finish and resistance to liquids.

 Terracotta Flower Pot, Large
 Terracotta Flower Pot, Large
 Terracotta Flower Pot, Large
 Terracotta Flower Pot, Medium
 Terracotta Flower Pot, Large
 Terracotta Flower Pot, Medium
 Terracotta Serving Plate, Large
 Terracotta Bowl, Medium
 Terracotta Flower Pot, Medium
 Terracotta Serving Plate, Large
 Terracotta Bowl, Medium

History Terracotta

History Terracotta

The term terracotta – from the Latin words 'terra cocta', meaning baked earth – refers to pottery that is hardened by fire at low heat, resulting in a brittle and porous product.

Terracotta is made from a mix of mainly clay and water. In pottery, its process is simple and consists of four basic steps: mixing, kneading, shaping and firing. A close attention to consistency and dampness of the clay is what guarantees its stability. The process of firing is usually done around 1,000 degrees Celsius, and it is during this step – when the iron in the clay reacts to oxygen – that the clay gets its typical red to ochre colour.

The only known form of ceramics until the 14th century, terracotta is versatile and durable and was originally used for large-size objects, architecture and sculpture. As the clay attracted the attention of craftsmen in the 20th century, it started to be used to make smaller pieces. Today terracotta is used to make utilitarian and decorative objects.

The colour of terracotta pottery depends on its use. Often left untinted and in its raw, porous texture, the clay can also be stained or glazed, to give it a shiny finish and resistance to liquids.

history Terracotta

From the Latin words 'terra cocta', meaning baked earth, terracotta is a mix of clay and water hardened by fire at low heat, resulting in a brittle and porous product. The typical red to ochre colour is produced when the iron in the clay reacts to oxygen during firing. Often left untinted and in its raw porous texture, terracotta can also be stained or glazed to give it a shiny finish and resistance to liquids.