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      program Archive Series ‘2017’

      The ‘2017’ Archive Series is directly modeled after a selection of six original mid-20th century utility gear and packs. The original bags are all results of military research and development, and distinguished by a minimal form-follows-function design where each shape, zip and compartment has a designated purpose. The series is crafted from a premium-quality mid-weight nylon weave – made in the Ishikawa prefecture in western Japan – inspired by the shell fabric used in MA-1 flight jackets.

      history Jungle pack

      Between 1939 and 1945, U.S. military equipment underwent continuous development to meet the specific needs created by different climates and environmental settings.

      The ‘jungle pack’ was a large canvas rucksack made in plain olive green and a camouflage pattern, designed for use in the tropical forests of the Pacific. It was more practical and had a much simpler design than its forerunner, which was an open piece of cloth where the contents were assembled and rolled together.

      The jungle pack, later known simply as ‘field pack’, featured separate waterproof bags and pouches stored inside the main compartment, to organise and protect extra clothing and blankets, toiletries, provisions and personal belongings.

      Two pairs of web straps ran horizontally and vertically around the body of the bag so that the volume could be adjusted to the contents. The bag was secured with a drawstring and covered with a waterproof flap. On top of the flap, a zippered compartment held a canteen, medical kit and other small articles.

      archive Jungle pack

      history Top-loading duffle

      The top-loading duffel – a cylindrical bag with a single opening at the top – has a long history as a common-issue item for the U.S. military since the 1940s. They were first created to fit a full allowance of clothing and equipment for overseas journeys.

      A vast improvement over the earlier, unmanageable ‘barracks bags’, the duffle was fashioned out of durable olive-drab duck or – when there was a shortage – denim. The bag was provided with a double-purpose handle so its owners could carry it like a suitcase at their sides or sling it over their shoulders.

      In the post-war decades, the bags became popular with an unlikely audience: surfers. In Australia and California, surfers packed military-issue duffle bags or canvas reproductions with towels and swim trunks, slinging the single strap over their shoulders.

      archive Jungle pack

      history B-4 flyers clothing bag

      First developed in 1931, the B-4 flyers clothing bag was a sturdy canvas carryall created to keep officers’ uniforms crisp and wrinkle-free in the cramped fuselages of their small aircraft. The olive-drab case, made of heavy-duty duck, could be unzipped, opened up and laid flat for packing. It had hangers, a snap partition for shoes, external pockets secured by big zips, and stiffeners on the top and bottom to hold its shape.

      The U.S. army – which has always supplied its enlists with special containers, bag and kits for almost every purpose – first developed the bag in 1931. But it underwent many iterations before it became the sturdy, virtually waterproof B-4 bag that was adopted by U.S. pilots. It is still in use today, but the modern version is produced using nylon.

      archive Jungle pack

      2017 Archive series

      history M1944 cargo field pack

      Inspired by the USMC M1941 pack system, the M1944 cargo field pack has a long, utilitarian history in the U.S. military across its branches. It was used as a holdall for the essentials one would need in the field.

      The M1944 consisted of an upper, square-shaped backpack with a detachable lower ‘cargo’ knapsack. The upper part was dedicated to lighter necessities – like underwear, a mess kit and toilet items – while the cargo pack was somewhat larger than an overnight bag, and packed with spare clothing and other ‘non-essential’ items. It attached to the bottom of the backpack using quick-release straps.

      With waterproof lining and a web-carrying handle on top, it was often used on its own as a furlough bag. The mouth of the pack had a rubberised fabric ‘collar’ that prevented its contents from getting wet in the rain, and it could be rolled to further improve its waterproofing.

      archive Jungle pack

      history Helmet bag

      The U.S. Air Force helmet bag is described in its military-standards document as a container with a rounded bottom, made from a heavy olive-green, water-repellent nylon material and padded with quilted rip-stop nylon, measuring 20 inches in height and 19 inches in width. It was designed to protect a flyer’s helmet from scratches when not in use and its development corresponded with the innovation of hard-shell helmets in the 1950s.

      The helmet bags that are designed today are generally adopted from a model that was introduced in the late 1960s. Like older versions, it features a large interior compartment for holding an aviation helmet, including radio and earphone attachments. New additions were two external pockets on the front of the bag, closing with snaps and hook-and-loop fasteners, and one inner pocket at each end of the liner, for storing small equipment and personal belongings. The bag had a top opening with a zip closure and two matching cushioned handles.

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      history Kit bag

      Used to store parachutes when they were not in active use, the British Royal Air Force kit bag was a durable and practical piece that could easily be hauled around – thanks to its two top handles and hardened, flat bottom.The big bag had a top zip that, on the inside, was protected by a flap to ensure that water did not touch the parachute inside. This was a particularly important feature if the parachute was made of silk, since the material gets weaker when it is wet.

      Most of the Air Force bags used for storage had the same heavy-duty zips as the kit bag – unlike military bags made for emergency situations, which used buckles and flaps so items could be taken out quickly. Often made of durable cotton, these kit bags had a very simple structure inside to keep it roomy, and make it easy to stuff in and take out the parachutes.

      archive Jungle pack

      program Archive Series ‘2017’

      The ‘2017’ Archive Series is directly modeled after a selection of six original mid-20th century utility gear and packs. The original bags are all results of military research and development, and distinguished by a minimal form-follows-function design where each shape, zip and compartment has a designated purpose. The series is crafted from a premium-quality mid-weight nylon weave – made in the Ishikawa prefecture in western Japan – inspired by the shell fabric used in MA-1 flight jackets.